Speak Out: Trainers and Instructional Design

 

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A few months ago, I got an opportunity to interact with learning professionals from behavioral and technical domains in a reputed company. Given below are a few things I noticed:

vía Speak Out: Trainers and Instructional Design.

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Mobile Learning: More than just Mobile + Learning | Social Learning Blog

Mobile learning seems to be creating a lot of excitement in the learning community these days. A quick Google search turns up lots of interesting information about the topic. For example, according to a report published by Ambient Insight Research, the US market for mobile learning products and services reached $958.7 million in 2010. They project that revenues will reach $1.82 billion by 2015.

vía Mobile Learning: More than just Mobile + Learning | Social Learning Blog.

The Three C’s of Social Networking: Consumption, Curation, Creation | Social Media Today

Over the years, social networks have lured us from the confines of our existing realities into a new genre of digital domains that not only captivated us, but fostered the creation of new realities. As George Bernard Shaw observed, “Life is not about finding yourself, life is about creating yourself.” Such is true for social networks and the digital persona and resulting experiences we create and cultivate. It was the beginning of the shift in behavior toward an era of digital extroversion, self-defined by varying degrees of sharing, connections, and engagement.

vía The Three C’s of Social Networking: Consumption, Curation, Creation | Social Media Today.

How to set up a classroom blog: 10 Essential Steps | The official blog of PikiFriends

Running a blog with your students is about as far from a traditional teaching method as you can get, and chances are nobody taught you how to do it. That’s why teachers who blog with students are usually those nonconformists types, radicals, free spirits, taking paths less traveled…well, not so much anymore. It’s actually become quite popular, but it certainly hasn’t hit mainstream levels, partly because it’s not as simple as using a chalkboard and textbook.

It doesn’t have to be so hard. After several years of blogging with students (mostly using PikiFriends), I’ve come up with a successful method which I hope others will find helpful.

vía How to set up a classroom blog: 10 Essential Steps | The official blog of PikiFriends.

El modelo caduco del uso de Moodle para el aprendizaje | XarxaTIC

A pesar que el título esté restringido a Moodle (por ser el LMS de mayor distribución y uso por parte de los docentes de nuestro país), podríamos haberlo sustituido tranquilamente por Chamillo, Sakai, Claroline o cualquier otro de las decenas de sistemas de gestión del aprendizaje (LMS) que se encuentran a nuestra disposición.

Unos llegan y algunos nos vamos (dejando mucho aprendido y habiendo cometido muchos errores -y algunos aciertos- en su uso). Eso no obsta para no tener en cuenta la gran potencialidad que presentan este tipo de LMS y la gran facilidad de uso para los profanos en mecanismos para la estructuración y distribución de contenidos educativos. Muchos cursos habilitados, muchas Administraciones compartiendo esos cursos encapsulados. En definitiva, muchos docentes que han encontrado el maná en una aplicación que les permite gestionar sus contenidos.

vía El modelo caduco del uso de Moodle para el aprendizaje | XarxaTIC.

Reflections on Instructional Design: 4 Fundamental Ways to Engage Students in an Online Course

 

Four ways to engage online students, 4 fundamental forms of online interaction

In my experience as over the last several years, an important part of providing a quality learning experience is engaging students- having them actively interact in meaningful learning experiences. This is particularly important in online courses where students may tend to feel isolated or removed from others. In this post I describe what I call the the 4 fundamental ways to engage students in an online course.

Four Fundamental Ways to Engage Online Students.

There are 4 basic ways to engage students in an online course:

Have students engage in doing real world tasks and solving real-world problems. This provides concrete, meaningful experience for the students and is much more intrinsically motivating to the students than learning content that doesn’t seem relevant to them. It means having students do relevant things that they will likely do in their careers or in their lives.

Engage students with the content in meaningful ways. this means having students use course content to solve problems or perform real-world tasks. It means providing students with well-designed multimedia. It means providing students with enough content that they can learn it and use it, but not so much content that they are overwhelmed.

Engage students with their peers. Students should interact with peers in the context of solving real-world problems. Students should present ideas, critique, give feedback, and collaborate together. This interaction builds a sense of community and there is a great deal of peer-to-peer teaching that can take place.

Engage students with the instructor. Students need guidance, support and feedback in the learning process. As one of my students wrote, instructors should “lead us through the fog.” The teacher should make themselves available and provide feedback and guidance quickly so that students can progress in their learning.

As I have taught online courses at several universities, I have found that students continually ask for and appreciate these kinds of interaction. And when I design my course to include these kinds of interaction, students seem more satisfied with and excited about the online experience. Students seem to thrive and enjoy with successful, effective, satisfying learning experiences.

What do you think? Are these really the 4 fundamental ways to engage students in an online course? What else would you add? What are your experiences with engagement as a teacher or a student in online courses?

Posted by joel gardner at 5:30 PM

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vía Reflections on Instructional Design: 4 Fundamental Ways to Engage Students in an Online Course.